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This week in anthropology

Map of Native American tribes you have never seen before 

Mayan cities rediscovered in the Yucatan 

Subway in the sky, new cable car system to link La Paz with El Alto on the plateau 

Peruvian artisans win cash award for weaving in textile contest 

Lessons from the last time civilization collapsed 

“Consider this, if you would: a network of far-flung, powerful, high-tech civilizations closely tied by trade   and diplomatic embassies; an accelerating threat of climate change and its pressure on food production; a rising wave of displaced populations ready to sweep across and overwhelm developed nations. Sound familiar?”

Archaeologists uncover first mass grave from 14th century bubonic plague outbreak, Barcelona

 

What makes humans special? A graphical tour of  our evolutionary advantages starts with anatomy 

The problem when sexism sounds friendly (in academia) 

Are Neanderthals human? Scientist discuss whether or not Neanderthals belong with homo sapiens 

Pre-Columbian mycobacterial genomes reveal seals as a source of New World human tuberculosis

Irish fair skin can be traced back to the Middle East and India 

European man’s remains found in ancient Chinese tomb

Homo floresiensis: scientists clash over claims ‘hobbit man’ was modern human with Down’s syndrome

Meet The Generation Of Incredible Native American Women Fighting To Preserve Their Culture

World’s first 3D printed vertebra implanted in 12-year-old boy

Four Cases of Life-Threatening Plague Found in Colorado

 

 

 

 

 

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This week in anthropology, archaeology, bioarchaeology, bioanthropology news

Skull of homo erectus throws story of human evolution into disarray 

9 Things you won’t see on display at the American Museum of Natural History 

AAA president defends social science research at NSF 

20 things you didn’t know about hoaxes 

Mausoleum go Augustus to be Restored, Rome 

Evolution of Irrationality in humans, learning from primates 

Pros and cons (and costs!) of taking your graduate studies abroad 

Tomb with pyramid entrance excavated in Egypt 

Looted bone boxes recovered in Jerusalem 

Maya skulls show evidence of wooden-club warfare 

Harvard discovered books bound with human flesh in library 

Illustrated story teaches kids natural selection 

Exhumed bones from Franco period bring crimes of Spanish dictatorship back to surface 

Traumatic skull injuries show that Maya used spiked clubs 

Byzantine monks used asbestos in wall frescos 

Byzantine mosaics uncovered in Israel 

Visit Angkor Wat using Good street view 

Things I wish I had known before beginning my Masters 

Jane Goodall celebrates her 80th birthday this week

Why anthropologists join an ebola outbreak team

10 reasons why everyone should love Jane Goodall 

Neanderthals genetic legacy among modern Europeans and Asians

Prehistoric artifacts found in Nashville ball park 

Tunisia returns stolen Mask of Gorgon to Algeria 

Early humans and saber-tooth cats co-existed 300,000 years ago 

New evidence exonerates rats as bearers of Black Death 

Did modern humans get fat from Neanderthals? Europeans have three times more Neanderthal variants in genes involved in lipid catabolism than Asians and Africans 

(a) Schematic representation of genomic distance calculations between contemporary human populations and Neanderthals. The genomes of out-of-Africa individuals were compared with the genomes of individuals of purely African ancestry (YRI). Single nucleotide differences from the Neanderthal genotype in an African genome were referred to as ‘ABBA’, while sites with the Neanderthal genotype in an out-of-Africa genome were referred to as ‘BABA’. (b) Average proportions of NLS in contemporary African (AF), European (EU) and Asian (AS) populations calculated based on sequence data from the 1,000 genomes project13; blue: genome wide (n=1,158,559 sites), red: LCP genes (n=498 sites). The error bars show the s.d. of the NLS proportion estimates. (c) Genomic distances between 11 contemporary human populations and Neanderthals; blue, genome wide; red, LCP genes. The maximal bar length corresponds to a NLS frequency of 30%. Placement of ASW and CEU individuals in sub-Saharan Africa and Western Europe, respectively, reflects their approximate historical geographical origins rather than their present location [Credit: Nature Communications, doi:10.1038/ncomms4584] Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2014/04/did-europeans-get-fat-from-neanderthals.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheArchaeologyNewsNetwork+%28The+Archaeology+News+Network%29#.Uz9yw1yRJg2 Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook

Sensors and satellites deployed to save Pompeii 

Ancient nomads spread earliest domestic grain over Silk Road 

Developers destroy Roman wall in UK 

Homo is the only primate whose tooth size decreases as its brain size increases 

Indigenous societies’ “first contact” typically brings collapse, but rebounds are possible